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Thursday, July 30, 2020 | History

3 edition of development of medical services in British Guiana and Trinidad, 1841-1873 found in the catalog.

development of medical services in British Guiana and Trinidad, 1841-1873

K. O. Laurence

development of medical services in British Guiana and Trinidad, 1841-1873

The evoluation [i.e. evolution] of long-term labour contracts in Trinidad and British Guiana, 1834-1863

by K. O. Laurence

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Published by University of the West Indies, Dept. of History in [ ] .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Statementby K.O. Laurence.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsMLCM 83/6139 (H)
The Physical Object
Pagination14, 27 p. ; 28 cm.
Number of Pages28
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL3835768M
LC Control Number81149864

Report of the Director of Medical Services Item Preview remove-circle Report of the Director of Medical Services by British Guiana. Medical Department. Publication date Topics Health Services Administration, Public Health Administration, Sanitation, Guyana Publisher.   By Jamellah Bayley. This article is the second in a two-part series that examines the health conditions in British Guiana during the s. Part one gave a brief overview of the general conditions.

CHAPTER 3. CONDUCT OF THE SECURITY FORCES. I. The Security Forces in British Guiana (a) The Police Force. The British Guiana Police Force was established by the Police Ordinance of which was subsequently continued by the Police Ordinance of and is now to be found in Chapter 77 of the Laws of British Guiana. The Census transcription page contains the Essequibo Census, plus censuses of all British Guiana-born citizens in , and , as well as all British Guiana .

Under the apprenticeship system agricultural and non-agricultural slaves worked 40 hours per week for their previous masters, in exchange for housing, clothes, food, medical . Trinidad and Tobago formally became an independent state and a member of the Commonwealth of Nations, on Aug. 31, During this period, the People's National Movement (PNM) took over. In , the joint islands became part of the Organization of American States and soon after, it formed the Caribbean Free Trade Area (CARIFTA), now known as.


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Development of medical services in British Guiana and Trinidad, 1841-1873 by K. O. Laurence Download PDF EPUB FB2

University of the West Indies (Mona, Jamaica). Department of History. Title(s): The development of medical services in British Guiana and Trinidad, ; The evoluation [i.e. evolution] of long-term labour contracts in Trinidad and British Guiana, / by.

The Development of Medical Services in British Guiana and Trinidad In Beckles, H. and Shepherd, V. (eds.) Caribbean Freedom: Economy and Society from Emancipation to the Present: A Student Reader, ().

K.O. Laurence, ‘The Development of Medical Services in Trinidad and British Guiana, –’, in Beckles and Shepherd (eds.), Caribbean Freedom, pp–73; J. De Barros, ‘Dispensers, Obeah and Quackery: Medical Rivalries in Post-Slavery British Guiana’, Social History of Medic no.2 (August ), –Author: Leonard Smith.

" * Keith Laurence, "The Development of Medical Services in Trinidad and British Guiana, " * Bridget Brereton, "The De‐ velopment of an Identity: The Black Middle Class of Trinidad in the Later 19th Century" * Patrick Bryan, "The Black Middle Class in 19th Century Ja‐ maica" * M.

Bacchus, "Consensus and Conflict. Harrison justly devotes almost half the book to its development, highlighting innovations and changes in surgery, wound treatment, disease such topics as the evolution of health services for women in Trinidad and Tobago, and of infant welfare in British Guiana; but men are welfare services in British Guiana after the.

A Question of Labour: Indentured Immigration into Trinidad and British Guianaby K.O. Laurence. Race Relations in Colonial Trinidad,by Bridget Brereton. Colonial Office List – British Guiana 1 British Guiana Colonial Office List Transcribed by S.

Anderson from a portion of The Colonial Office List forcomprising Historical and Statistical Information respecting the Colonies of Great Britain, an account of the services.

The history of Trinidad and Tobago begins with the settlements of the islands by Amerindians, specifically the Island Carib and Arawak peoples. Both islands were visited by Christopher Columbus on his third voyage in and claimed in the name of Spain.

Trinidad remained in Spanish hands untilbut it was largely settled by French colonists. Tobago changed hands between the British. British Guiana Colonists Index "H" Home A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z.

This index of 18th and 19th century residents of the colonies of Berbice. HISTORICAL DEVELOPMENT OF EDUCATION IN TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO The population of Trinidad in when the Spanish surrendered to the British ; by when slavery was abolished it had increased to 43, consisting of 3, Whites (Spanish, French and English), 18, Free Coloured, 20, Negro Slaves and Aborigines.

Immigration into Trinidad and British Guiana, – (Kingston, ), pp. –98, see also his ‘‘The Development of Medical Services in British Guiana and Trinidad, – ,’’ in Caribbean Freedom: Economy and Society from Emancipation to the Present, ed.

Hilary Beckles and Verene Shepherd (Kingston, ), pp. – K.O. Laurence, ‘The Development of Medical Services in British Guiana and Trinidad –’, in Hilary Beckled and Verene Shepherd (eds), Caribbean Freedom (Kingston: Ian Randle, ), –73 Google Scholar.

Social and Economic Obstacles to the Development of Popular Education in Post-emancipation Jamaica, — 2 Keith Laurence The Development of Medical Services in Trinidad and British Guiana, 3 Bridget Brereton The Development of an Identity: The Black Middle Class of Trinidad in the later 19th Century 4 Patrick Bryan.

British Guiana - By Raymond T. Smith Oxford University PressReprinted Reprinted in by Greenwood Press, Connecticut. In or I was asked by the Royal Institute of International Affairs in London to write a general book on British Guiana.

I readily agreed to do so in spite. In some colonies, especially those employing immigrant workers from Africa, India and Portugal on the sugar estates, planters continued the practice established during slavery of contracting for weekly visits from physicians.

7 Such was the case in Trinidad and British Guiana. 8 In the latter, some planters arranged to have doctors visit the. Trinidad and Tobago - Trinidad and Tobago - History: When Christopher Columbus reached Trinidad in on his third voyage, the island was inhabited by Arawakan-speaking tribal groups originally from the Orinoco River delta region and a smaller number of Cariban speakers.

In the 16th century many of these Trinidadian Indians were captured by Spanish slave traders. Addeddate Camera Sony Alpha-A (Control) External-identifier urn:oclc:record Foldoutcount 0 Identifier b Identifier-ark.

The authors examined children aged years in Trinidad and in British Guiana. The British Guiana children showed the greater incidence and extent of maxillary and mandibular gingivitis and of mandibular calculus.

A high degree of association was found to exist between gum disease and calculus deposition. Children from " sugar-cane districts " had, on the whole.

Section Seven: Social Policy and Class Formation * Introduction * Carl Campbell, "Social and Economic Obstacles to the Development of Popular Education in Post-Emancipation Jamaica, " * Keith Laurence, "The Development of Medical Services in Trinidad and British Guiana, " * Bridget Brereton, "The Development of an Identity.

The increase of general instability in Latin America, the rise of Castro and the imminent independence from British rule of Jamaica and soon thereafter of British Guiana and possibly Trinidad must mean that whilst on the one hand American defensive interest in the area is heightening, on the other British interest, and capacity, in maintaining.

The development of medical services in Trinidad and British Guiana, / Keith Laurence. The development of an identity: the black middle class of Trinidad in the later 19th century / Bridget Brereton.Collection: Caribbean Colonial Statistics from the British Empire, Volumes British Guiana, The Guianas were first settled by the Surinen people of the Americas, followed by Amerindian tribes.

The first European colonizers were the Spanish inthen came the Dutch fromthe English and French colonizers would also.The author, who was sent on an expedition to study malarial problems by the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, has nothing but praise for the thoroughness with which the Americans have converted the Panama Canal Zone from a white man's grave into a district that compares favourably with temperate countries.

The anti-mosquito measures carried out under the .